Saturday, June 11, 2005

UNreality

In an article about possible enlargement of the UN Security Council, the BBC says that:
The Security Council - the UN's main decision-making body - reflects the balance of power at the end of World War II.
Call me crazy, but it seems to me that the last thing the UN and its acolytes want is to update the Security Council to reflect the current balance of power, for if that were to happen, the US and China would be the only two permanent members and the only members with veto power.

4 Comments:

Anonymous Paul said...

I don't know if you see the same, but your blog has no left hand margin at my end. This makes it surprisingly difficult to read.

4:28 PM  
Blogger Scott Callahan said...

Try to simply increase the size of your window. I've noticed that if the window is narrow enough, the left margin disappears, but as the width of the window is increased, eventually the left-hand side of the text will start to pull away, and there will be a margin.

6:06 PM  
Blogger mamapajamas said...

I've got another POV on the UN, too...

If the EU ever gets their constitution (I hope not!), shouldn't they be reduced to one vote in the UN? I mean... that would make them like the US, and we don't get 50 votes.

Or maybe we should increase the number of US votes, if they get stubborn...

7:20 AM  
Anonymous Mark Miller said...

To mampajamas-

"If the EU ever gets their constitution (I hope not!), shouldn't they be reduced to one vote in the UN? I mean... that would make them like the US, and we don't get 50 votes."

I was wondering the same thing. They were, after all, talking about having a unified foreign policy after the constitution's passage, so that would tend to diminish the roles of individual countries' diplomats. I read somewhere that Europe has tried unification in various forms since the fall of the Roman Empire, and it's never worked. Perhaps they ought to be satisfied for now with just having a common market. Problem is, because most countries in the EU use the Euro, they can't control their own monetary policy anymore. That's one of the main reasons the French and German economies are flat-lining (absent any other solutions like lowering taxes, reducing their extravagant welfare programs, etc.).

6:29 AM  

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